Recommended Reference Component: Revel Performa3 F206 Loudspeakers

Revel Performa3 F206Recommended Reference ComponentIf you heard that you could, for a very affordable price, buy a loudspeaker with reference-class neutrality, cutting-edge clarity, and breathtaking transparency, while sacrificing only a couple areas of performance that might not be important to you anyway, would you jump at the chance to own it -- or at least try your best to hear it? That kind of sound quality is precisely what can be heard from the Performa3 F206 loudspeaker -- a compact, incredibly accomplished floorstander that sells for just $3500 USD per pair and can easily compare with topflight speakers costing much more. The F206 comes from Revel, a well-known US speaker brand established in the 1990s, and whose Salon2 loudspeaker was the very first product to be included in our list of Recommended Reference Components.

Doug Schneider reviewed the Performa3 F206 for this site last month, and wrote this about its sound: “As much as I enjoyed how the F206es looked in my room, I was taken aback by how they sounded, regardless of which electronics I used with them. In fact, I was floored. Right off the bat, the F206’s midrange grabbed me -- it didn’t only sound very natural and neutral, in a typical Revel kind of way (the midband in all Revel speakers is exceedingly linear), but also so startlingly clear that I had a hard time believing that these speakers could cost only $3500/pair -- it was the kind of sound I expect from speakers costing much, much more. The voices of Leonard Cohen, Sade Adu, Van Morrison, and Greg Keelor -- all of which I know well because I play them through every speaker I review -- sprang from the F206es completely unfettered. They sounded so natural, detailed, and realistic that I was immediately reminded of PSB’s Synchrony One, which I raved about five years ago, and Definitive Technology’s Mythos ST-L, which Roger Kanno has just praised on SoundStage! Access (I have a pair of ST-Ls here). Both of those speakers present the midrange unbelievably well and, like the F206, can be compared in that regard to speakers costing far more. Both do cost more than the F206 -- the One now goes for $5500/pair, the ST-L $5000/pair -- so you can understand why I was astonished by what I heard from the Revels.

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Recommended Reference Component: Axiom Audio M100 v4 Loudspeakers

Axiom Audio M100 v4sRecommended Reference ComponentIn Oliver Amnuayphol’s review of the Axiom Audio M100 v4 loudspeaker, which we published in June, he stated: “The M100’s uncanny blend of low-compression, superb bass quality and quantity, and lively yet uncolored tonal balance, makes it one of the most well-rounded, non-hair-shirt, will-please-just-about-anyone speakers you can buy at any price.”

Obviously, that’s high praise. But the fact that the M100 v4 starts at only $2790/pair in the standard Black Oak finish (the premium vinyl and wood veneers, and the painted finishes, cost extra) gives his words that much more weight -- these days, speakers can cost tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars.

The M100 v4 measures 47.5"H x 9.25"W x 17"D and weighs about 70 pounds. It’s a three-way design with three woofers and, uniquely, two midranges and two tweeters. The midranges and tweeters are doubled up to produce higher output with lower distortion in the midband and high frequencies. The three woofers and accompanying ports combine to produce prodigious bass.

Oliver spent a little bit of time setting up the M100 v4s and, once he had, it didn’t take him long to recognize the speaker’s strengths: “Satisfied with the M100 v4s’ positions, I spun up Grizzly Bear’s awesome disc of modern rock, Veckatimest (CD, Warp 0182). The album’s mix of deep bass, wide dynamic range, and varied usage of acoustic and electronic instruments sounds best through speakers capable of handling such demanding extremes, and it took only the first track, ‘Southern Point,’ for me to hear that the Axiom M100s were handily up to the task. The sound they poured into the room was loud, deep, and clean, with a generally even-handed tonal balance and an effortlessly dynamic sound.

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Recommended Reference Component: Ayre Acoustics KX-R Twenty Preamplifier

Ayre KX-R TwentyRecommended Reference ComponentThe original Ayre Acoustics KX-R preamplifier was reviewed by Pete Roth for SoundStage! Ultra in December 2010, and was named a Recommended Reference Component here in March 2011. Pete ended up buying the review sample. Last month, in Ultra, Jeff Fritz reviewed the KX-R’s successor, the KX-R Twenty, which this month is added to the same list. Jeff, like Pete, owned a KX-R, and said of it in his review, “It might be the single best stereo component I’ve ever owned.”

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Recommended Reference Component: Devialet 120 Integrated Amplifier-DAC

Devialet 120Recommended Reference Component“The Devialet 120 is a state-of-the-art piece of hardware, an inspired design marked by deep originality and a thorough understanding of how humans actually interact with modern technology.”

Those are some of the strongest words Hans Wetzel has ever used in a product review, and for good reason -- in his July 1 SoundStage! Access assessment of the Devialet 120 integrated amplifier-DAC, he also called it the “single most impressive product” of his reviewing experience. That’s high praise for what is currently Devialet’s lowest-priced product, which retails in the US for $6495. Above the 120 in Devialet’s line are the 200 ($9495) and 250 ($17,495). (Each model number reflects its product’s power output into 6 ohms.) Like the 120, the 200 and 250 are stereo designs, but the latter two can be configured as mono amplifiers of even greater power and lower distortion.

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Recommended Reference Component: Audeze LCD-X Headphones

Audeze LCD-XRecommended Reference ComponentOn March 1, SoundStage! Xperience published Garrett Hongo’s review of Audeze’s LCD-3 headphones, which he thought worthy of a Reviewers’ Choice award. Based on the strength of that review, last month we added the LCD-3s to our Recommended Reference Components list. About two-and-a-half months later, Xperience published S. Andrea Sundaram’s review of Audeze’s LCD-X headphones, which also received a Reviewers’ Choice award -- and this month, we name the LCD-Xes a Recommended Reference Component.

The LCD-3 and LCD-X headphones use planar-magnetic drivers -- a hallmark of Audeze ’phones -- and are more or less identical in size, shape, and weight. But there are some differences, including in price: the LCD-3s retail for $1945, the LCD-Xes for $1699. The most visible difference is in the earcups -- the LCD-3s’ cups are of Zebrano wood, while black-anodized aluminum is used for the LCD-Xes.

Things differ somewhat inside as well. Brent Butterworth’s measurements of the two models, which accompany the reviews, reveal comparable frequency responses throughout the audioband; in other words, the two models’ tonal balances should be similar. The measured distortion of both sets of ’phones was negligible at SPLs of 100dB, which means both should sound superclean. But the impedances differed: 47 ohms for the LCD-3s vs. 22 ohms for the LCD-Xes. Most noteworthy was the LCD-Xes’ far higher sensitivity -- 101.5dB vs. 94.5dB for the LCD-3s -- which Brent said was “very high for planar-magnetic headphones.”

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